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Jewellery and coins found at 9,000-body burial site being dug up for roadworks

Archaeologists working on the site of a huge burial ground have uncovered a range of unusual items
Archaeologists working on the site of a huge burial ground have uncovered a range of unusual items (Picture: SWNS)

A 200-year-old graveyard where more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up as part of efforts to build a new underpass.

Archaeologists working on the Highways England project have unearthed a treasure trove of artefacts including jewellery, cooking utensils and coins.

Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground on the A63 in Hull, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution between 1783 and 1861.

So far, one-third of all the skeletons recovered from the site are children aged 18 and under including 40 children who were buried there after the site was closed.

At this stage, it’s not known how or why they came to be there.

All the bodies must be exhumed before work can start on the £355million roadworks project.

An 80-strong team of experts are carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.

Once the relevant groundworks have been completed, the bodies will be reburied on the same site, which at the time was called Trinity Burial Ground.

The dig on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ??355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ??? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull???s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
80 experts are working on the dig (Picture: SWNS)
Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
This strange bottle of dark liquid was one of the items found on site (Picture: SWNS)
Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
Jewellery has also been dug up (Picture: SWNS)
Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
This shell was also found by archeologists excavating the site (Picture: SWNS)

Highways England has described the project, which began in 2015 and will end this summer, as ‘incredible’ – and say their efforts have ‘revealed intriguing clues’ from the past.

The site was in use at a time when the population of Hull was rapidly expanding, as commercial and industrial activity intensified in the 18th and 19th century.

It has been found that individuals were buried in different sections depending on their wealth, with richer people located further away from the city centre.

One item that has been dug up, which has been sent away for testing, is a sealed blue bottle marked ‘Hull Infirmary’, which contains a mysterious brown liquid inside it.

Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
Some of the items date back to the late 1700s (Picture: SWNS)
Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
Experts say the finds are helping them piece together Hull’s history (Picture: SWNS)
Some of the items exhumed by Highways England as part of the building of a new ?355million project on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks. See SWNS story SWLEbones. A burial ground dating back to the 1700s where it's believed more than 9,000 bodies are buried is being dug up by Highways England as part of ?355million roadworks. Workers on the A63 in Hull, East Yorks., are making way for a new underpass ? while archaeologists investigating the site uncover piece after piece of fascinating history. Thousands of skeletons have been exhumed from the burial ground, which was in use during the Industrial Revolution - and Hull?s boom years - between 1783 and 1861. An 80-strong team of experts are not merely moving the bodies to make way, but carefully excavating them and carrying out examinations before logging the information.
It’s thought many of those buried on the site will have living descendants in the city (Picture: SWNS)

Highways England are encouraging Hull locals to get in touch, saying that they will pass on any and all information they have about people’s potential ancestors.

It’s thought many of those buried on the site likely have living descendants in the city today.

Fran Oliver, assistant project manager, said: ‘The quest to piece together the history of Hull has been incredible so far, revealing intriguing clues from the past.

‘Our archaeologists, carrying out the city’s largest ever archaeological dig, have already found a wealth of information about the lives of society at a time when the population was rapidly expanding, as commercial and industrial activity intensified in the 18th and 19th century.’

Later this month site workers are expected to start recording the underground footings of an 18th-century jail which once stood at a corner of the site.

Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at webnews@metro.co.uk.

For more stories like this, check our news page.

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